Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Nikon D300 14-bit RAW/NEF Goodness - Great Falls Maryland

I just said this in another post, but, Great Falls National Park is one of my favorite places in the world. It's located just about a half hour from me, and I get there often, especially this time of year when sunset is late in the day, and I can make it there after work for sunset. Tonight's sunset was after ~8:40PM.

I've been in to HDR processing for a while. Read on for how I've used my FujiFilm S5 in the past for this, and now use the Nikon D300 14-bit RAW/NEF files for this.

Nikon D300 14-bit RAW


Here's the 3 exposures I output from a single Nikon D300 14-bit RAW/NEF file:
-2.3EV
2008_0617_D300_28127-minus2.3
0EV (as shot)
2008_0617_D300_28127-miunus0
+2.3EV
2008_0617_D300_28127-plus2.3

And here's the final image, HDR processed single RAW file and cropped, posted on flickr:
My Favorite Place Great Falls National Park (also D300 14bit RAW/HDR info)


I've made a couple of HDRs via a single RAW file with my FujiFilm S5 Pro as well. Here's one from Sunrise at Blackwater:
Dawn @ Blackwater Refuge

And Tai Shan at the US National Zoo:
Tai Shan @ US National Zoo 2/17/2008

Both of those were exported at different exposures (multiple) and merged in Photomatix.

I'm pretty happy with both camera's ability to log a pretty wide range of data. Normally I don't much care for RAW files, but when trying to specifically capture a high dynamic range, it seems like a great approach.

Why not just bracket some JPGs? Well, I did that for a while, but with motion, getting a multi-photo merge to look perfect isn't that easy. When using a single image, that problem goes away. If that one file has enough data to "add stops" to the output image, it'll work better.

-Jon

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3 comments:

Peter said...

This is a great little tutorial Jon it's nice to see how much can be done with a single shot HDR. I've had the same issues with trying to line up bracketed shots, even on a tripod. Random elements in the scene like birds and clouds can be a real trick to match cleanly.

Peter said...

This is a great little tutorial Jon it's nice to see how much can be done with a single shot HDR. I've had the same issues with trying to line up bracketed shots, even on a tripod. Random elements in the scene like birds and clouds can be a real trick to match cleanly.

gmr2048 said...

Thanks Jon! I love seeing the pieces that make up a final image. I need to spend more time doing HDR images.