Thursday, November 11, 2010

Chincoteague NWR, Fall 2010

From: http://natureandwildlifephotography.blogspot.com/

A couple weeks ago I had my most productive visit to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.

The thing that set the visit apart was the morning encounters I had with some herons and egrets.

Egrets on OrangeSome Light

Golden Snowy

Color and good light makes normal things special, and great things extra special.

I've taken lots of heron and egret photos but really just about none when there was such magical light. Two things combined - the sun was rising behind me a bit, and there was a touch of fall foliage in front of me. The two combined to bathe these birds in light and color.

MondayCatch and Release

Half a Great Egret, and a Full Snowy Egret

Shooting at Chincoteague can be a little tough, mostly because lots of people go there, and they are often tourist types that see someone or some thing and stop and all get out at once. On the day I got these shots that happened a couple times and I left and came back hoping the birds that all flew away would come back - and it sort of worked.

While there I also saw the roughly 1000 snow geese, and a few skimmers, hawks, falcons and some shovelers and other ducks...

Nikographer.com / Jon
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4 comments:

Smile (lifeincolorblog.blogspot.com) said...

These are beautiful! The orange light really adds to the amazing heron! I love them! you capture the moment in the most amazing way! I have a photography blog of my own, not as good, but if you would like to see it, go to the link above and below. Again, beautiful, amazing pictures.

Smile
lifeincolorblog.blogspot.com

adampinnell said...

Wow! Beautiful colors, light and focus! Great work!

Peter said...

Your photos are absolutely incredible! Thank you so much for sharing them with your readers.

I'm hoping you might join us in a recent wildlife project we've launched.

Our ultimate goal is to build the go-to platform for documenting all the world's organisms and through doing this we hope to develop an effective way to measure Mother Nature's pulse. By encouraging the masses to document their encounters with nature, we hope to build a powerful force for data collection and an important educational tool for wildlife awareness and preservation.

We hope you'll support us on this mission by joining Project Noah today. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at peter@projectnoah.org & http://www.projectnoah.org

Joshua Kirton said...

Beautiful capture of color. The orange goes so well with the feet and beak of the bird.